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20130421
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to justice. [ cheers and applause ] >> heather: an amazing moment. jim gray is a sportscaster and fox news contributor. jim, what is it about a sporting event that can bring us altogether and allow us all to heal just a little bit, maybe for the moment? >> it's always been an escape. it's a chance to set aside all the problems that go on. it brings the community together. it allows everyone to have a place where they can vent their emotions and try and get away from the realities of life. it's been a great healing in many times of crisis throughout our country's history. >> heather: you've been a sportcast terrify for many years. this was done following 9/11. in the days that followed that, liza minelli and belting out new york, new york. that was september 21st. shoe share some of your reflections and times you remember events have been able to, country has been able to heal due to a sporting event? >> i don't think when president bush took the mound at yankee stadium and he threw out the first pitch. the whole thing had just been a month. it was still so very, very fresh. here the leader
torrential rains hit the area. a swollen river is forcing evacuations and road closures in some areas. jim spellman is live in peoria, illino illinois. it looks bad where you are. that water seems pretty high. >> about 14 feet above where it normally is right now, fredricka. this is the illinois river. it goes right through the heart of peoria, illinois. this building, the historic river station trying to keep dry. they're pumping out rooms in there. you can see people here are doing everything they can to try to prepare for another two feet or so of water. here in downtown peoria along the waterfront, they have erected this sort of handmade levy. sand bags over walls. they predict the water is going to get to just about here. if their predictions are right, they're hoping most of the businesses here are going to be okay. if their predictions are off, if any more rain comes or is higher than they predict, it will be trouble for the businesses. we were up in neighboring peoria heights, illinois. several businesses under water there. with 2 more feet to go in that part of illinois, there's g
have a number of reports this morning. to begin we hear from john miller and then jim axel rod. to begin we hear from john miller and then jim axel rod. >> reporter: it was a week of images, both frightening and inspiring. the chaos of a terrorist attack and the heroism of the response. in erie videos from security cameras we saw brothers tamerlan and dzhokhar tsarnaev allegedly on the way to place the bombs. and then the gripping 28-hour manhunt. there was an ambush that left a young police officer dead. and a gun battle that left a transit police officer badly wounded and ended the life of tamerlan tsarnaev. dzhokhar tsarnaev, his younger brother, was lost spotted in this infrared photo hiding inside a boat as the drag net closed in around him. his f.b.i. wanted poster now marked captured is the image that puts to a close the first chapter in the story of the boston marathon bombing. and so the next chapter opens with nothing but questions. questions posed by the president himself. >> why did young men who grew up and studied here as part of our communities and our country re
program, dr. jim walsh. have you done any studies as far as cost/benefit? because that's the other thing i'm concerned about, the ramping-up of security and the billions of dollars being spent. is it being spent with some benefit? >> yeah, it's a great question. i was in boston on 9/11 sitting in front of a camera like this talking about the challenges that day. and you know, i find myself years later in the same situation. and in that intervening time, we've spent a lot of money and a lot of time and effort trying to improve security and trying to train, prepare, implement rules that would make the country safer. and so i have two reactions to what you're saying. on the one hand it seems evident to me, as i've watched events unfold this week in boston, that we have learned. we are better at this than we were before. that's not to blame folks on 9/11. that was a different scale attack. it's the first time we dealt with it. any time you deal with something the first time you're not going to be very good at it. but it's clear that we're way better at this, way better prepared, and training a
name is jim rainey, more recently a political writer at "the l.a. times." the couple announcements, everyone should turn off their cell phones. probably turn them off, even if they're on vibrate. richard is particularly sensitive. is a cell phone goes off, he will hunt you down and correct it. after the session, there are going to be signing of the folks here about today and the signing area is area one, which you can look on a map where someone will direct you. you're also not opposed to record this. i'm going to introduce the three panelists, starting in the middle with jon wiener. john teaches at you see irvine and has contributed an editor to the nation agassi. he also is a weekly radio program wednesdays at 4:00 p.m. on 90.7 fm. he is best known for suing the fbi for their files on john lennon. that story was told in the book, give me some truth, the john lennon ei trials. his most recent book is how we forgot the cold war, historical journey across america, which you can pick up later and get signed to john. that is john in the middle. next we've got the brass who has a home
now. u.s. remember at the beginning of the iraq war, jim asked me a question, does this still hold true today? do movie stars need be afraid to speak out? and i would say, yes. the lesson is, if what you care about is your pocketbook, if you want to speak out and be pro patriotic and defend america right or wrong, you'll never get in trouble. if you want to be critical of foreign policy because you belief, as a citizen -- remember, we have a thing called the constitution. all men are created equal. everybody, at least from the beginning, white, male, 2 1, with property, could vote. since then we've expanded -- well, i'm not being sarcastic because in terms of the world to have any white male who was sovereign, that we were sovereign. the american revolution declared the people sovereign rather than a king or queen. you couldn't have a king or queen taking your land away because they had finch it to you through sovereign rights. so if every citizen has a right to say what they should or should not do in our government, we would think we could respect that, and yet at the very begi
unemployed during the great depression, and you had jim crow where it was legal and de facto segregation. you didn't find the same kind of criminality. we have spent $16 trillion since 1965 on poverty, and what we've done is we've destabilized families. that is why when a kid sees a gang banger, as you mentioned, he looks at that gang banger and thinks, hey, this is what i want to be. he doesn't have a father to say, wait a second, this is not the way to go. hit the books two good, hard hours a day. finish high school, don't have a kid before you're 20 years old and get married before you have that kid. if you do that, you will not be poor. the question we have to ask ourselves is, what policies are we doing that are giving people the incentive or disincentive to follow that formula? >> host: larry elder, a conversation between you and your mother beginning with your mother. your mother thought -- your father thought small. don't make the same mistake. that's unfair. oh, here you go again, defending him. he's not donald trump. he was a wimp, she said. >> guest: yeah. my mother -- she was in a
reform was being debated former senator jim demint from south carolina told his colleagues the need to vote against obama cared cared we need to break the obama administration. senator mcconnell for senate majority leader from the republicans announcing in 2010 that his highest priority, the senate majority leader was making barack obama the one-term president. if we had a coalition presidency were each party would elect a partner it wouldn't stand to gain as much clinical opposition. no matter what they did it was still share the white house with the other party so then it would be much freer to judge legislative proposals on their merits. so to put it another way, it's not surprising when you have a winner-take-all election for presidency whose power has grown to a level of the presidency you shouldn't be surprised that we have high levels of partisan conflict. indeed if you go back the increase in partisan conflict, to go back to the 50s and 60's there is much more of a cross party lines. if you look at partisan conflict graph it has risen since the 40s in the 50s grassley to lev
completely agree. one of the close i found i especially really like was from a former congressman jim kline and he said it's a little hard to believe that your nonfiction book you can't put down. and i thought that it was especially appropriate because if you like this book, it's different from a lot of nonfiction work that i've read. and that it really does read like a thriller. it really does, it takes these little discussions, and jack should manatee, humanity side to it. >> guest: we like to think it's an important book in the sense that it tells you how the court works. there are so few good books out there that explains what's the process, how do they go about this, how do they decide these cases, what are they saying to one another? we see these cases that split the court five before. what do they think? to the personal this get into it? so it's about not just about capital punishment. it's a book about how the court operates. >> guest: when he did get into those in the library of congress, the memorandum, the notes back and forth between the justices that are available him and a lot
jihadist. we'll show you that video and ask our security analyst jim walsh what all of this means. we had never used a contractor before and didn't know where to start. at angie's list, you'll find reviews on everything from home repair to healthcare written by people just like you. no company can pay to be on angie's list, so you can trust what you're reading. angie's list is like having thousands of close neighbors where i can go ask for personal recommendations. that's the idea. before you have any work done, check angie's list. from roofers to plumbers to dentists and more, angie's list -- reviews you can trust. i love you, angie. sorry, honey. twenty-five thousand mornings, give or take, is all we humans get. we spend them on treadmills. we spend them in traffic. and if we get lucky, really lucky, it dawns on us to go spend them in a world where a simple sunrise can still be magic. twenty-five thousand mornings. make sure some of them are pure michigan. your trip begins at michigan.org. yeah, i'm looking to save, but i'm not sure which policy is right for me. you should try our cover
vacated by jim benning and one against the candidate and quickly founded the tea party caucus. boss, a group of which i may be the only member, only two times have we hadfa an december ron paul in 2011. the only other father-son team of was mitt romney and his dad, and former gov. george romney. now on to monday and mechanical matters. we are on the record, no live tweeting. c-span has agreed not to use the session for a least one hour. to ask auld like question, do the traditional thing and send me a non thready and signal and i will happily call on one and all. now that he has had to buy its cultural offer our guest the opportunity to make some comments and then move around the table. the floor is yours. >> it sounds like with all of these rules that we're going to create some news this morning. i don't know about that. >> we live in hope. >> as i was going round the room, i was thinking i was in a wedding of receiving line. if anybody feels compelled to send me a wedding gift, it has to be under $14 to meet the senate limit. i was told anything short of 13 hours of speaking would
was then the news hour and now is the news hour with jim lair all the way. when you listen to the program you're going to get both sides. so we completely identify with the approach of u.s.a. today. but we live today i think all of us recognize in a much more partisan bitter maybe too strong a word but i think it fits in many ways. and some people say well it goes back to the election of 2000 and it's the war in iraq but i think it's more than that. i've seen it -- i was at cnn for 12 years, and you see it as you say in the e-mails you get from people. some people just are never are just not going to be happy. the thing that's reassuring to me though is that you get 150 e-mails from people saying you were tilting too far one way and you tilted too far the other way. and you want to be down the middle and you're going to get that kind of reaction. my question is though does it -- you know, we need to have a healthy debate about these issues but do you want people to be at each other's throats? and i think that's some of what's going on right now. and i think that's something we ought to contin
people on the books, find out who they are. the issueur calls on of boy scouts of america we welcome jim to the conversation from oklahoma. good morning. the gay crowd wants to push how they live on uni. they should be able to decide their own rules and the government should be completely out of it. just like the gay marriage thing. if they want to get married, fine. if a certain church doesn't want to marry them, then so be it. the government should stay out of the whole issue. that's it. host: part of the debate this week on what to do with the alleged bomber involved in the killing of three bostonians over this past week. the headline, republicans want the boston bombing suspect treated as an enemy combatants, sparking miranda debate. key republicans are calling on the obama administration to declare the 19-year-old suspect an enemy combatant subject to the loss of four, so intelligence officials can continue to interrogate him for as long as they deem necessary. authorities captured him in watertown, mass. friday evening. they are invoking the public .afety exception he remains hospi
the period of jim crow. that is our live coverage for today and we hope your life again tomorrow. right now we are going to go to the hancock foundation building and this is where the history panel here at "the los angeles times" festival of books is just beginning. you are watching booktv on c-span2. [inaudible conversations] >> will you let me know when we are supposed to start? [laughter] >> good morning. that is my signal. my name is tim newton on back of "the los angeles times" and i'm pleased to welcome you to the 2013 festival of books. books. more specifically i'm delighted to welcome this morning to today's panel which brings some really remarkable authors to talk about their latest work and the idea behind him. before we get going i have been handed a piece of paper that says it's critically important that i read this. please silence all cell phones and i also need to tell you there is a book signing following the session here the book signing for this panel is in the staging area number one. i am told this is on the festival map and the center of the event program so the office h
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14